IMAG-E-NATION the political & philosophical arts initiative blog


(re)imagining the political and philosophical in the 21st century


The Political & Philosophical Arts Initiative is interested in the ways in which people interact with and compose political and philosophical ideas and actions through the various, diverse media of technology and the arts. Participants in PAI seek to explore the ways in which poetry, literature, music, photography, performance and other creative arts interleave with the political and philosophical life, either as vehicles for criticism, elaboration, theorization, intervention or activism.
The Imag-e-nation blog is a forum for interested parties to share stories, images or other contributions. Contributors range from students and faculty to artists and musicians to professional and casual commentators. Pieces can be short opinions, re-postings of appropriate materials, or original compositions. In addition, the PAI at LUC will make a selection of relevant or provocative news items each week for (re)publication here.

Inquiries:
imagenation[at]politicalarts.org




Burning Images, Hanging Dissent: Lecture on 5 November


Burning Images, Hanging Dissent
5 November 2014, 18:00 - 20:00
The Living Lab @ Schouwburgstraat 2, The Hague

A lecture by artist Florian Göttke, with a response by curator Brigitte van der Sande and a discussion with the audience moderated by philosopher Cissie Fu.

Brought to you by the Political and Philosophical Arts Initiative in collaboration with See You in The Hague and i4C Art-Active Lab, coinciding with Guy Fawkes Night.

Hanging or burning effigies as a sign of dissent is a longstanding and recurring practice in political protests, performed in demonstrations all over Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, North Africa, India and many other Asian countries. The practice is full of ambiguities and slippages, as the protesters readily incorporate influences and combine practices from various origins (annual purification rituals, carnival, formal justice, and communal shaming) for diverse purposes.

In his lecture Florian Göttke delineates the practice in US history from the burning in effigy of British tax officials and loyalists in the American Revolution until the hanging and burning of the last two US presidents Bush and Obama. Looking at this alternative history of effigy protests, one can easily trace the societal conflicts haunting the United States: the formation of the Union through the struggle against British rule, the abolition of slavery, the civil war, WWI, depression, WWII, civil rights issues, racial segregation, contentious wars overseas, and the current partisanship.

Enacting this performative practice, the protesters enter the discourse about the constitution of a just society, of legal and political legitimacy, political representation, the role of the citizens, and the possibilities of direct action. As the effigy practices are closely related to formal and informal justice, the lecture draws parallels with Sam Durant's work Scaffold and its subject, the iconic official executions by hanging in US history.
Free entry and registration, with drinks to follow.

Join us for this burning discussion!
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